Linux desktop (Ricing) thread

#4
I have an i3 config (i3blocks, i3-gaps, i3lock-fancy, the works) sitting in my dotfiles, but despite how customizable it is, I prefer something easier to set up (KDE at the moment). With i3, everything is accomplished with separate programs, most of which are only easily installable from the AUR (so Arch-linux only, which I don't mind, but in some cases I want something more stable).
 
#5
I have an i3 config (i3blocks, i3-gaps, i3lock-fancy, the works) sitting in my dotfiles, but despite how customizable it is, I prefer something easier to set up (KDE at the moment). With i3, everything is accomplished with separate programs, most of which are only easily installable from the AUR (so Arch-linux only, which I don't mind, but in some cases I want something more stable).
Having well organised dotfiles means I can get my usual i3 environment up and running on an Arch system with an hour, as I found out recently Ubuntu takes a bit longer to set up because there isn't the AUR and a lot of stuff has to be built from source. In terms of stability, I've had no issues at all except those I've caused myself by doing something stupid in the ~1 year I've been running Arch as my daily OS.
 
#22
I don't know if it counts as ricing, but I'm pretty happy with how my KDE Neon desktop looks currently:
desktop_screenshot_10-7-18_clean.png
desktop_screenshot_10-7-18.png

If you're wondering where the tabs went and what the bar is on the side, that's Tree Style Tabs. In essence it puts a bar on the side of the screen that lets you structure your tabs in a tree, and it's absolutely amazing. Admittedly I did have to do a bunch of userChrome.css modifications to get it looking this nice, so it isn't going to look like that out of the box (and no, this isn't Google Chrome, that's just what Firefox calls the file where you put custom CSS to change its appearance). For instance, by default, it takes up a fixed amount of space on your screen. What I set it up to do in my userChrome.css was to make it expand when I hover over it (to the normal fixed size) and shrink when I move the mouse off of it (how it looks in the screenshot).
 
#23
I don't know if it counts as ricing, but I'm pretty happy with how my KDE Neon desktop looks currently:
desktop_screenshot_10-7-18_clean.png
desktop_screenshot_10-7-18.png

If you're wondering where the tabs went and what the bar is on the side, that's Tree Style Tabs. In essence it puts a bar on the side of the screen that lets you structure your tabs in a tree, and it's absolutely amazing. Admittedly I did have to do a bunch of userChrome.css modifications to get it looking this nice, so it isn't going to look like that out of the box (and no, this isn't Google Chrome, that's just what Firefox calls the file where you put custom CSS to change its appearance). For instance, by default, it takes up a fixed amount of space on your screen. What I set it up to do in my userChrome.css was to make it expand when I hover over it (to the normal fixed size) and shrink when I move the mouse off of it (how it looks in the screenshot).
Very tidy setup. Is it possible for windows to not flow underneath the dock by default? or did you manually place it like that? I assume if you hit maximize it won't do that.
 
#24
Very tidy setup. Is it possible for windows to not flow underneath the dock by default? or did you manually place it like that? I assume if you hit maximize it won't do that.
Both docks auto-hide when focused windows are underneath them. To access them while they are hidden I hover the mouse near where they meet the edge of the screen. I like to take advantage of every pixel of my crappy Dell 1280x1024 monitor.
 

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