[Giveaway] Idle Horror Keyboard Show (The Board Podcast 2000 Subscriber Giveayway!)

#1
We're celebrating reaching 2000 subscribers on YouTube!

As promised, we're running 2 giveaways, one is the CozCaps RoBear in WareBear colourway, and its open to everyone here at this Gleam link: https://gleam.io/voLAn/the-board-podcast-2000-subscriber-giveaway

The second giveaway is the CozCaps IdleKey2 in Gilded Purity.

This thread is for the entries for the IdleKey2 giveaway.

Rules:

  1. Post your best Horror Story with a Mechanical Keyboard Twist IN THIS THREAD ONLY.
  2. The story can be just text, with/without images, its entirely up to you.
  3. It can be as long or short as you like.
  4. The TypeHype Community will be able to read and vote upon their favourite stories with a Like.
  5. The story with the most Likes at the closing time wins!
The competition will end at Midnight of 28th September 2018, AEST Sydney Time. This means plenty of time to get creative!

The prize will be announced after the closing date, and the IdleKey2 will be posted to the winner once details are obtained, at no cost to the winner, and is open to everyone internationally.
Postage however will be at lowest reasonable rate with no tracking.

Best of Luck, you can post questions and tag me in the post in this thread, and then later edit your post with an entry if you have questions before you make your entry.

Happy Clacking!
 
#3
Is real stories allowed?

It was a early morning in the evening months, i was on my way to work. the rain was hitting the window on the bus while i stared out into the darkness only light up by passing cars, light posts, and stores starting to open. It was a going to be a good day, I knew that there were not that many tickets open in the ticketing system, and that since people were starting to go on vacation for the winter that I would not be bothered by calls. When the bus finally arrived I quickly got out and started speed walking towards my workplace. It was still dark, and the rain had picked up so I began to run towards the office, when I finally arrived I was drenched and just wanted to get into the building and dry off.

Oddly enough I was the first person to arrive, our receptionist is always there early but I had beat her there today, I thought for myself. I typed in my pin code and got into the office itself, but I could not turn on the light. Not thinking much more of it I continued walking to my desk and quickly noticed that something was wrong, there was something that light up the room in a calm orange light. With a high pulse I quickly and sweat on my forehead I saw something so horrible that I would never forget.

My model M’s LED’s was blinking. Not consistent, just randomly. Confused I started up my computer to see If I could use the keyboard. No luck. I unplugged the keyboard and plugged it in again. Still no luck. I was still troubleshooting the issue when my colleague turned on the light, and in the process scared me more than I am willing to admit. We quickly started troubleshooting the issue and determined that I had by accident used a defective USB hub that had fried my beloved Model M.

(Some details has been changed for dramatic effect.)
 
#6
Since I'm terrible when it comes to storytelling the traditional way, I tried to contribute some fictional movie poster from which people can imagine a possible "Frankenswitch Monster".

I tried to draw inspiration from the Idlekey sculpt too


Frankenswitch by OutragedPudding (1.0) lowres.jpg
look, i'm probably gonna sit down and type out an entry (got a doozy of a tale), but i don't see how anyone can compete with this.
 
Likes: TC
#7
look, i'm probably gonna sit down and type out an entry (got a doozy of a tale), but i don't see how anyone can compete with this.
Easy! I didn't respect the traditional storytelling technique here, so anyone can type up a story vaguely inspired by this poster or have their own go at producing non-text content that tells a keyboard-related story :) Scary sound effects with switch clicks used, an edited keyboard review video, more posters... anything goes, right?
 
#8
Easy! I didn't respect the traditional storytelling technique here, so anyone can type up a story vaguely inspired by this poster or have their own go at producing non-text content that tells a keyboard-related story :) Scary sound effects with switch clicks used, an edited keyboard review video, more posters... anything goes, right?
Thats right, and you got to be in it to win it. So, anyone who doesn't even enter has given up before they started!
 
#9
Okay.

I used to work on the 11th floor of a non-descript office building on the edge of the city. I did data-entry in a low-walled almost-cubicle, in an ocean of 'semi-open work-plan' almost cubicles. We used to call it 'the sea', because the dividers had a slight wave to the top of them. I guess it was designed to defeat that hard-edged brutalist look that the cubicle farms of the 80's and 90's so often possessed. When you got off the elevator you could see the entire cubicle-wall structure. It looked like the waves in a stage play. When seated at your desk, the undulating heights of the walls meant that you couldn't see the person directly opposite you, but you could turn your head to the left or right and see the tops of seated heads as well as the walking workers amongst the sea surrounding you.

My job was dull. Inputting numbers and addresses. Moving data from one archaic system to another, which would then generate and populate yet another.
It was tedious, and repetitive, but I didn't mind. I was at a point in my life where obscurity, invisibility, and repetition were what i needed.

I kept regular working-hours. There was almost never a need for over-time, and I very rarely had to stay late. If over-time was required, it was usually requested via email. I'd receive an email from my supervisor (who would usually receive a request from another supervisor), asking me to stay back and work on a particular set of data that was required urgently, or had been corrupted and needed to be re-populated. It would usually only require an extra two or three hours. I received one such email on a Wednesday. It wasn't the last Wednesday I worked there, but it stands out nontheless.

I had been asked to stay back and complete a data-set. At five pm the steady stream of headnods and polite waves began as my mostly nameless co-workers filed past the low-points of my sea-wall on their way to the elevator. Some of them would be going home, some of them would go to dinner, some would go straight to the gym in the basement of the building. I never thought about where they were going once those elevator doors closed. The truth is- I never really thought about them at all.

About a half-hour after the last head had nodded and disappeared, my left monitor static-screened. It wasn't bright. There was no sudden flash, it just sort of displayed a whole bunch of blocky mis-matched colours and lines, and then went black. I kept my left monitor vertical, and my right monitor horizontal. The left displayed the data I needed, and it was contained in a large form or data sheet. If i displayed it on a horizontal screen I would have to scroll to read the last couple of lines (often the most important part of the data-set), but having it vertical meant I could see the entirety of the data. It was efficient. I was efficient. Until the screen was gone.

Without the screen, I would have to bring up the database on my right screen, and constantly switch. Or, as I decided to do- print the screens I needed, refer to them to input my data, and then shred the pages when completed. The database was so old that it could only print to a dot-matrix printer. Sure, the company could have had someone correct that. But it was cheaper not to. Hell, the company could have had someone create a way for these programs to all talk to one another, but it was cheaper to just have me.

Are you old enough to have ever seen a dot-matrix printer? I still find that sound comforting, even now. I stood there watching it print, listening to the slight echo of the shuttle return as the sound left the print room and reverberated across the open, empty sea. I walked back from the print room to my cubicle with my head down and my eyes on the floor. It was habit.
I sat at my desk and arranged the paper so that the endless run of data on perforated, un-seperated pages was clipped to a large bulldog clip blu-tacked to the top of the now dark monitor. When I'd completed a page I could just fold and re-clip the run. That way, almost nothing had changed. the data was still where my eyes wanted it to be, it was just in a more 'Flintstoned' form.

I began to input the data and noticed that my keyboard appeared to have an odd echo. I'd never noticed it before, but then, it was so rare to be in the office alone. I finished the page and reached up to unclip it when I realised the echo didn't quite stop when I did. Odd, sure. But there's so many walls and odd reflective surfaces in this place that it was to be expected. I completed the second page, and I heard the echo again. This time it seemed to last a little longer? Did it? The third page, yes! Longer again. But, what legitimately concerned me at this point, was that I felt like it didn't match my rhythm. All typists, whether they're programmers, data clerks, coders, PA's, anybody who types all day has a particular rhythm to how they type. It's as unique as your handwriting. Our hands favour certain positions, and we strike keys harder or softer, faster or slower based on the innumerable differences in our fingers, hands, wrists, body position, typing style and life experience. The typing i could hear wasn't an echo. It wasn't me. I stuck my head up, over the sea. I thought I was here alone. Maybe someone else was stuck here tonight too?

I couldn't see anybody. I stood up and looked out, ahead, back. I was drifting in the sea, alone. I sat back down. I'm going crazy. Just get it done and go hug your cat. I started the next page and stopped abruptly. The echo stopped too, albeit bluntly. aggressively. Like they hadn't anticipated the stop and hit the last keys forcefully. I pulled up Notepad, and decided to test them. Listening closely, I typed slowly. They typed slowly. I typed quickly. They typed quickly. I typed in a stilted, staccato rhythm. They matched. Then, in a moment of sudden clarity, I saw what I had actually been typing. When I opened Notepad to test this 'echo', I had just started typing out song lyrics. In the past, a person may have recited poetry, or shakespeare. For future generations, it will probably be memes. But for my generation, it's song lyrics. Only these weren't song lyrics. What the hell had i just typed?
 
#13
We're celebrating reaching 2000 subscribers on YouTube!

As promised, we're running 2 giveaways, one is the CozCaps RoBear in WareBear colourway, and its open to everyone here at this Gleam link: https://gleam.io/voLAn/the-board-podcast-2000-subscriber-giveaway

The second giveaway is the CozCaps IdleKey2 in Gilded Purity.

This thread is for the entries for the IdleKey2 giveaway.

Rules:

  1. Post your best Horror Story with a Mechanical Keyboard Twist IN THIS THREAD ONLY.
  2. The story can be just text, with/without images, its entirely up to you.
  3. It can be as long or short as you like.
  4. The TypeHype Community will be able to read and vote upon their favourite stories with a Like.
  5. The story with the most Likes at the closing time wins!
The competition will end at Midnight of 28th September 2018, AEST Sydney Time. This means plenty of time to get creative!

The prize will be announced after the closing date, and the IdleKey2 will be posted to the winner once details are obtained, at no cost to the winner, and is open to everyone internationally.
Postage however will be at lowest reasonable rate with no tracking.

Best of Luck, you can post questions and tag me in the post in this thread, and then later edit your post with an entry if you have questions before you make your entry.

Happy Clacking!
Unlike @MehAdviceGuy I didn’t destroy a Model M. I committed an arguably worse sin due to ignorance.

About 20 years ago I had several friends who worked for Rochester Computer Recycling & Renovation in upstate NY. One day they mentioned they’d gotten in a load of hardware and asked if I wanted any for cheap, on the dl. Turns out that among other less notable things they’d scored about 20 Model M boards, many dirty, some missing keys, but mostly all working. I didn’t know the (future) value of what I was looking at and I foolishly demurred. I can hear you right now reaching through your screen to grab me by my collar and shout “WHAT WERE YOU THINKING????”

Being realistic I imagine that through 10 or so moves and several partners, substantial pressure might have been brought to bear to lighten such a hypothetical stash of Model Ms. That would, of course, have been a test of my character. Instead I have to contend with a stain on my long-ago character. I endeavor to make up for this past error in judgment in the present day by collecting and building mechanical keyboards, so all is not lost. Now I have one lone Model M (pictured, along with my daily driver), given to me by one of my Rochester friends, so in a way I suppose it’s come full circle. It just had it’s 25th birthday (shoutout to r/ModelMBirthdays).

5900AA21-DA85-4345-9DD8-BFA889E8F208.jpeg

If I could go back in time I would rant and rave and scream and shout at my 20-year-old self. He might not believe that the mid-90’s hardware from stodgy old IBM would retain so much value and have such nostalgia 20 years later, but I suppose that’s the rub, nobody can predict the future!
 
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